Steve Jenkins Obituary – Death, Steve Jenkins has passed away unexpectedly

By | January 12, 2022

Steve Jenkins Obituary, Death, Cause Of Death – Award-winning children’s author and illustrator Steve Jenkins, widely praised for his distinctive and detailed cut- and torn-paper collages depicting animals and the natural world, has died at age 69. Jenkins was born on March 31, 1952, in Hickory, N.C., to Alvin, a physics professor, and Margaret, a bank employee, and homemaker. In an interview with Something About the Author, Jenkins recalled a childhood as a military brat, moving frequently while his father served in the military and pursued science degrees at various universities. But no matter where they lived, Jenkins said, “I maintained a small menagerie of lizards, turtles, spiders and other animals and collected rocks and fossils.

I also spent a lot of time with books.” Jenkins was enthralled by science and loved to draw and paint what he saw in nature. He has said that he came to both of these passions by way of his father, who was a “frustrated artist.” The elder and younger Jenkins would perform science experiments together and collaborate on projects like animal scrapbooks and drawings of lizards and bugs they had captured in their ventures outdoors.

Award-winning children’s author and illustrator Steve Jenkins, widely praised for his distinctive and detailed cut- and torn-paper collages depicting animals and the natural world, has died at age 69. Jenkins was born on March 31, 1952 in Hickory, N.C., to Alvin, a physics professor, and Margaret, a bank employee and homemaker.

Steve Jenkins Obituary – Death, Steve Jenkins has passed away unexpectedly

In an interview with Something About the Author, Jenkins recalled a childhood as a military brat, moving frequently while his father served in the military and pursued science degrees at various universities. But no matter where they lived, Jenkins said, “I maintained a small menagerie of lizards, turtles, spiders and other animals and collected rocks and fossils. I also spent a lot of time with books.” Jenkins was enthralled by science and loved to draw and paint what he saw in nature.

He has said that he came to both of these passions by way of his father, who was a “frustrated artist.” The elder and younger Jenkins would perform science experiments together and collaborate on projects like animal scrapbooks and drawings of lizards and bugs they had captured in their ventures outdoors.